Kellyanne Conway’s Husband Touts Poll on GOP Voters Who Want Trump Challenged in 2020

Uh, he’s doing it again.

George Conway, the conservative lawyer married to Kellyanne Conway of the White House, has posted yet another critical tweet about President Trump. This time, Conway posted some unflattering statistics about how many GOPers think someone in the Republican Party should challenge Trump for the presidency in 2020.

Conway took notice of a piece from Ben Shapiro which points out a major generation gap in Trump’s base of supporters. Weekly Standard reporter Haley Byrd tweeted the piece while highlighting polling data that shows 82 percent of conservative voters aged 18-24 want Trump to be challenged in the primaries, whereas 74 percent of voters aged 65 and up don’t want that to happen.

As you can see, whatever his reason, Conway took things a step further by pointing out the demographics from even more age groups that want Trump’s re-election to be contested inside the party.

This is hardly the first time Mr. Conway tweeted something critical about his wife’s boss, and the media has taken plenty of notice. Mrs. Conway was recently asked for her thoughts about this, though she ended up snapping at CNN’s Dana Bash for asking a “cheap & irrelevant” question.

[Image via screengrab]

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PAPER TRAILS: Epic sale continuing in Conway; Arkansas Black Hall of Fame inductee dies

LARGE-SCALE SALE: "Unbelievable Antique Hoarder Sale" boasts a Conway listing on EstateSales.net.

Unbelievable is right.

Ivo Jones, whose Ivo Jones Designs Inc. is handling the unreal, upscale estate sale of china, crystal, antique furnishings and designer accessories at 2312 Martha Drive (tinyurl.com/conwaysale) says, "The house is full. … We brought in almost a 2,500-square-foot event tent. We’ve got a 1,600-square-foot storage building, plus a four-car garage. And the house is 7,400 square feet heated and cooled. … It’s an unbelievable lifetime collection."

To prepare for it, Jones says, "We started Jan. 19, so it took us three months and one week and 4,500-plus man-hours — I clocked it."

As for the story behind the sale, Jones says: "It was an antique collecting/hoarding deal, and it just ultimately culminated in a divorce. And the judge ordered all the excess sold. … You could furnish five or six homes out of this one house easily. … We tagged over 3,500 pieces of clothing. There were over 500 purses, over 300 pairs of shoes, about 500 perfume bottles, hundreds and hundreds of pieces of jewelry."

The sale began last weekend and continues with discounts up to 50 percent from noon to 4 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday. More sales are likely.

Jones says, "A hoarder sale is never one sale."

CAN’T FORGET JEANNETTE: Theater legend Gertrude Hadley Jeannette, who was born in Urbana in 1914, died in New York in April at age 103.

Jeannette, who was inducted into the Arkansas Black Hall of Fame in 1999, was a playwright, producer, director, actress, civil rights activist — and a cabdriver. She was "believed to be the first woman to drive a cab in New York City," according to her obituary in The New York Times.

The Times writes that on Jeannette’s first day, she "got in an accident — on purpose" after being cut off by another cab: "’I rammed my fender under his fender, swung it over to the right and ripped it.’ … When the other driver got a good look at her, she recalled, he screamed: ‘A woman driver! A woman driver!’"

The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture says, "Jeannette’s experience driving a cab inspired her creatively, especially in playwriting." She had roles in Broadway plays such as Lost in the Stars, Amen Corner and The Great White Hope and in films like Shaft, Black Girl and Cotton Comes to Harlem.

Jeannette certainly had a lot of drive.

SundayMonday on 05/06/2018

Print Headline: Epic sale continuing in Conway

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Storm system spawns tornado in Arkansas, blizzards in Plains

A line of thunderstorms pass over a barn near Baldwin City, Kan., Friday, April 13, 2018. The area was under a severe thunderstorm warning. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A potent spring storm system that’s expected to persist through the weekend raked across the Midwest, spawning at least one tornado in Arkansas as blizzard conditions blanketed much of the Northern Plains.

A tornado ripped through the tiny Ozark Mountain town of Mountainburg, Arkansas, injuring at least four people and causing widespread damage Friday afternoon.

Crawford County Emergency Management Director Brad Thomas said there were at least three entrapments following the twister. He said he did not know the condition of the four people hospitalized.

Video from the scene showed uprooted trees, overturned cars, damaged buildings and downed power lines.

The huge storm, packing enough energy to cause widespread disruption, isn’t unprecedented for April, said Jake Beitlich, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Chanhassen, Minnesota.

"We do get pretty powerful systems coming throughout the Midwest, and on the cold side we do get snow. And this one is particularly strong. So we do have a lot of moisture with it, and a lot of energy," Beitlich said. "Over the next 24 hours cold air is going to get wrapped into this system and we’re going to see a band of heavy snow develop from southwestern Minnesota through northern Wisconsin. Also we’re going to have really strong winds, especially in western Minnesota."

Blizzard warnings stretched from northern Kansas across most of Nebraska and South Dakota into southwestern Minnesota and northeastern Iowa, with winter storm warnings and watches covering most of the rest of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. Heavy snow already blanketed parts of western Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota by early afternoon Friday, closing major highways in South Dakota and many roads and highways in western Nebraska — including a 200-mile stretch of cross-country thoroughfare Interstate 80 from North Platte west to the Wyoming border.

A road conditions report said most roads in the Nebraska Panhandle to east of Valentine in the northern part of the state were impassable because of heavy snow cover.

The snow also led officials to shut down the Sioux Falls, South Dakota, airport Friday afternoon through Saturday night.

Snow, freezing rain and high winds were expected through Saturday night, with heavy ice accumulations in parts of Michigan through Sunday morning.

A swath of southern Minnesota, including Minneapolis though northern Wisconsin, was expected to get 8 to 12 inches of snow or more. Parts of northern Nebraska could get up to 18 inches, with up to 12 inches in northwestern Iowa. Wind gusts of up to 50 mph will make travel hazardous.

The National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma, had issued tornado watches Friday for eastern Texas and western Louisiana, moving up through eastern Oklahoma, Kansas, Arkansas and into Missouri and Iowa. The weather service also warned of the potential for strong thunderstorms, large hail and damaging winds for Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana and eastern portions of Texas.

In Conway, Arkansas, strong winds caused damage at several buildings at the University of Central Arkansas on Friday. The school said on its Facebook page that students were evacuated from an all-female freshman dormitory after its roof was damaged. No injuries were reported.

In Mountain Home in northern Arkansas, authorities evacuated a nursing home after its roof was severely damaged by heavy winds. Police said no injuries were reported.

The threat of severe weather prompted officials with the French Quarter Festival in New Orleans to cancel all of Saturday’s events, held outdoors across 23 stages scattered throughout the historic neighborhood. Organizers said the festival will reopen for its final day on Sunday at 11 a.m.

Forecasters said Alabama was also at risk for a weekend of severe weather, with the National Weather Service predicting storms beginning over north Alabama early Saturday will create a threat of winds up to 60 mph and tornadoes through Sunday.

The Storm Prediction Center said there’s an enhanced risk of bad weather in an area that includes Birmingham, Huntsville and Mobile, and that Montgomery is on the fringe of the risk area.

Severe thunderstorms also popped up to the north Friday morning in parts of Wisconsin, Minnesota and South Dakota. Golf ball-sized hail fell Friday morning in parts of southwestern Wisconsin, covering the ground like snow in Richland Center and Gays Mills. Large hail also fell in Parker in southeastern South Dakota while pea-sized hail fell in nearby Sioux Falls.

"That that just kind of again speaks to how strong the system is, where you’re going to get a lot of snow on the cold side, and severe thunderstorms in the warm part of the storm," Beitlich said.

In South Dakota, where a blizzard warning covered much of the state, authorities issued no-travel advisories for many highways and closed much of Interstate 90 in the western half of the state. Gov. Dennis Daugaard closed state government offices in 32 counties ahead the approaching blizzard. Dozens of school districts canceled classes ahead of snow accumulation expected to reach as much as 18 inches in some areas. Rapid City had already received 5.5 inches by 10 a.m.

Dangerous fire weather conditions in Oklahoma contributed to wildfires that forced hundreds of people to evacuate their homes near Woodward, about 125 miles (200 kilometers) northeast of Oklahoma City. Emergency crews in western Texas were also battling wildfires amid forecasts of extreme fire danger.

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Detroit News’ Big Ten Spring Power Rankings

(Photo: Daniel Mears, Detroit News)

Go through the gallery above to view The Detroit News’ Big Ten Spring Power Rankings or click here.

The first games are still months away, but spring football is done and we at least got an idea of where teams in the Big Ten stand heading into 2018.

So, with all that knowledge, we figured we take a shot at ranking all 14 teams. It’s kind of our “way-too-early rankings,” only we just stuck to the Big Ten.

As usual, the East is loaded with the top four teams all potentially good enough to make it to the conference championship game in Indianapolis. And over in the West, things haven’t changed much, either, as it’s Wisconsin and everyone else.

With that, here’s our look at the Big Ten entering the offseason:

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Downtown Conway apartments proposed

Anthony Penix, left, and Chris Ramsey, in the hole, employees of McCracken Industries of Bigelow, work on a sewer on Spencer Street in downtown Conway. David Gustafson of Mallard Ready Mix, standing at left, and James Walthall of McCracken Industries, standing at right, are also shown. The streetwork is being done in conjunction with a proposed apartment complex, JLofts, planned for a location west of Malvern National Bank.

CONWAY — A survey of young professionals that the Conway Area Chamber of Commerce conducted a few years ago showed many of them would live downtown if they had more options — now they will.

Salter Properties plans to build JLofts, a four-story complex with parking on the ground level and 21 one- and two-bedroom units on the top three floors. The structure will be on a narrow lot on Spencer Street, west of Malvern National Bank on Markham Street.

“To have brand-new construction in the heart of downtown is a big thing for us,” said Brad Lacy, president of the chamber and Conway Development Corp. “It’s that next step in seeing downtown develop like I think everybody wants it to.”

Jason Lyon, assistant director of planning for the city of Conway, said, “It’s a very, very tiny property right behind the bank. It’s essentially going to be a zero lot line. You go behind the bank — from their curb over to the power poles — that’s where they’re fitting it in. It’s maybe 60 feet wide, max.”

However, he said the design works, based on preliminary drawings he has seen. The city has had meetings with Brent Salter, vice president of Salter Properties, and his crew, Lyon said. Beth Reed, interior designer for Salter Properties, said last week that Salter was not available on Tuesday or Wednesday, before press time, to discuss the project.

“They haven’t formally submitted anything for review,” Lyon said. He said preliminary site work can be done, “but before they can pour footings and foundations, they have to go through development review.”

Drawings will be reviewed by the Conway Planning Department, along with the Sanitation, Street and Engineering, and Fire departments, as well as Conway Corp., the city’s utility.

“Specific architecture is required because it’s in the Markham Street Corridor,” Lyon said. Markham Street is being redeveloped to connect Conway and Hendrix College. “As properties are turning over, any new development — that’s where the Markham Street plan comes in. We’re going to encourage closer to the street, … almost an extension of the downtown area. Shops close to the street, on-street parking, tree-lined streets — we’ll encourage mixed use, maybe retail on the bottom with residential on top.”

Streetscaping, including trees planted within a well in a sidewalk, will be done for the JLofts project, Lyon said, similar to Arvest Bank and CVS Pharmacy near downtown. In addition to the parking in the bottom floor of the building, Lyon said on-street parking will be utilized.

Lacy said JLofts “is going to be the first big example of downtown housing and will probably test the market very well.”

“A few years ago, we did a survey of young professionals,” he said. “We really reached out to Acxiom and HP and put it online to figure out how many people would want to live in downtown if those options were available, and the results were pretty strong. We had, I think, nearly 500 people who participated, and over 50 percent of them said if those options were available, that would be their preference.”

Some of the respondents did not live in Conway at the time.

“That’s the big question mark — how many people don’t live here because those options aren’t available?” Lacy said. “That’s sort of the great unknown — how many of these do we have? I think we have a lot of them, demographically, but it’s hard to determine that ceiling.”

Lacy said that because the apartment complex will be just steps away from Kings Music on Front Street, restaurants and other venues, “I think [the complex is] going to really appeal to young professionals, maybe some young marrieds — people who want to walk out their door and have all these amenities.”

He said the first inkling that a project was underway was Conway Corp.’s work on Spencer Street. “They’ve been burying power lines, redoing sewer, redoing the water,” he said.

Lyon said work has also been done on Smith Street between Front and Spencer streets because it was in “pretty bad disrepair.”

Kim Williams, executive director of the Conway Downtown Partnership, said JLofts are “brand new — that’s something we haven’t had.”

“[The apartments will] have their own parking area contained underneath, and they’ll become more of the fabric of downtown, really. They’re truly urban apartments,” she said.

Downtown Conway has eight loft apartments on Front Street, she said, and one on Oak Street.

A few years ago, Steve Strange remodeled the 16,000-square-foot building he owns at Locust Avenue and Caldwell Street. The University of Central Arkansas leased the 16-apartment building for eight years for student housing, but now the building is open to anyone.

Lance Johnston renovated a two-story 1930s apartment building to create four apartments called Faulkner Flats, which is in a residential area near the downtown core.

Williams said she doesn’t count apartment buildings on Front and Spruce streets that are filled with Hendrix students.

JLofts will “make it truly more of a neighborhood” downtown, Williams said. “Everybody likes a more walkable neighborhood.” She said leaders of downtown companies, such as Metova, have expressed interest in downtown living.

The complex is scheduled to open in summer 2017, Williams said.

Senior writer Tammy Keith can be reached at (501) 327-0370 or tkeith@arkansasonline.com.

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Market Update: Interest Rate Velocity

Summary

Last week ended in a risk-off mode, where we saw the market take a bit of a hit.

There is concern about the velocity of the move we’re seeing in interest rates.

The expectations are high for this earnings period, so any disappointment will likely drive the market a little lower.

By OpenMarkets

As interest rates markets rise, Jack Bouroudjian looks at the effects on equities. He also looks ahead to next week with some key earnings reports due.

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Massive storm system spawns tornado in Arkansas, blizzards in Midwest

MINNEAPOLIS — A potent spring storm system that’s expected to persist through the weekend raked across the Midwest Friday, spawning at least one tornado in Arkansas as blizzard conditions blanketed much of the Northern Plains.

A tornado ripped through the tiny Ozark Mountain town of Mountainburg, Arkansas, injuring at least four people and causing widespread damage Friday afternoon.

Crawford County Emergency Management Director Brad Thomas said there were at least three entrapments following the twister. He said he did not know the condition of the four people hospitalized.

Video from the scene showed uprooted trees, overturned cards, damaged buildings and downed power lines.

The huge storm, packing enough energy to cause widespread disruption, isn’t unprecedented for April, said Jake Beitlich, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Chanhassen,
Minnesota.

“We do get pretty powerful systems coming throughout the Midwest, and on the cold side we do get snow. And this one is particularly strong. So we do have a lot of moisture with it, and a lot of energy,” Beitlich said. “Over the next 24 hours cold air is going to get wrapped into this system and we’re going to see a band of heavy snow develop from southwestern Minnesota through northern Wisconsin. Also we’re going to have really strong winds, especially in western Minnesota.”

Blizzard warnings stretched from northern Kansas across most of Nebraska and South Dakota into southwestern Minnesota and northeastern Iowa, with winter storm warnings and watches covering most of the rest of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. Heavy snow already blanketed parts of western Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota by early afternoon Friday, closing major highways in South Dakota and many roads and highways in western Nebraska — including a 200-mile stretch of cross-country thoroughfare Interstate 80 from North Platte west to the Wyoming border.

A road conditions report said most roads in the Nebraska Panhandle to east of Valentine in the northern part of the state were impassable because of heavy snow cover.

The snow also led officials to shut down the Sioux Falls, South Dakota, airport Friday afternoon through Saturday night.

Snow, freezing rain and high winds were expected through Saturday night, with heavy ice accumulations in parts of Michigan through Sunday morning.

A swath of southern Minnesota, including Minneapolis though northern Wisconsin, was expected to get 8 to 12 inches of snow or more. Parts of northern Nebraska could get up to 18 inches, with up to 12 inches in northwestern Iowa. Wind gusts of up to 50 mph will make travel hazardous.

The National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma, had issued tornado watches Friday for eastern Texas and western Louisiana, moving up through eastern Oklahoma, Kansas, Arkansas and into Missouri and Iowa. The weather service also warned of the potential for strong thunderstorms, large hail and damaging winds for Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana and eastern portions of Texas.

In Conway, Arkansas, strong winds caused damage at several buildings at the University of Central Arkansas on Friday. The school said on its Facebook page that students were evacuated from an
all-female freshman dormitory after its roof was damaged. No injuries were reported.

In Mountain Home in northern Arkansas, authorities evacuated a nursing home after its roof was severely damaged by heavy winds. Police said no injuries were reported.

The threat of severe weather prompted officials with the French Quarter Festival in New Orleans to cancel all of Saturday’s events, held outdoors across 23 stages scattered throughout the historic neighborhood. Organizers said the festival will reopen for its final day on Sunday at 11 a.m.

Forecasters said Alabama was also at risk for a weekend of severe weather, with the National Weather Service predicting storms beginning over north Alabama early Saturday will create a threat of winds up to 60 mph and tornadoes through Sunday.

The Storm Prediction Center said there’s an enhanced risk of bad weather in an area that includes Birmingham, Huntsville and Mobile, and that Montgomery is on the fringe of the risk area.

Severe thunderstorms also popped up to the north Friday morning in parts of Wisconsin, Minnesota and South Dakota. Golf ball-sized hail fell Friday morning in parts of southwestern Wisconsin, covering the ground like snow in Richland Center and Gays Mills. Large hail also fell in Parker in southeastern South Dakota while pea-sized hail fell in nearby Sioux Falls.

“That that just kind of again speaks to how strong the system is, where you’re going to get a lot of snow on the cold side, and severe thunderstorms in the warm part of the storm,” Beitlich said.

In South Dakota, where a blizzard warning covered much of the state, authorities issued no-travel advisories for many highways and closed much of Interstate 90 in the western half of the state. Gov. Dennis Daugaard closed state government offices in 32 counties ahead the approaching blizzard. Dozens of school districts canceled classes ahead of snow accumulation expected to reach as much as 18 inches in some areas. Rapid City had already received 5.5 inches by 10 a.m.

Dangerous fire weather conditions in Oklahoma contributed to wildfires that forced hundreds of people to evacuate their homes near Woodward, about 125 miles (200 kilometers) northeast of Oklahoma City. Emergency crews in western Texas were also battling wildfires amid forecasts of extreme fire danger.

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Advocate plays role at women’s shelters in Conway, Cabot

Donna Francis of Conway started in March 2017 as direct-service advocate at Lonoke County Safe Haven in Cabot, and in January, she also became the sexual-assault coordinator at the Women’s Shelter of Central Arkansas in Conway. Francis said her goal is to empower domestic-violence and sexual-assault victims.

People in Conway and Cabot may have noticed Donna Francis in her bright-blue-and-camo Toyota 4×4 truck.

“I don’t like to be bland and blend in. I like to stand out,” she said.

Francis, 44, wants people to know she’s the woman helping sexual-assault and domestic-violence victims.

“It’s protection. If anything were to happen to me, they’d know my truck,” she said of law enforcement.

She is the new sexual-assault coordinator for the Women’s Shelter of Central Arkansas in Conway from Tuesday through Friday each week.

She’s also the direct-service and sexual-assault advocate and for Lonoke County Safe Haven in Cabot, also a shelter for up to 16 domestic-abuse victims and their children. Francis has her own room in the shelter and lives there from 8 a.m. Sunday until 8 a.m. Tuesday, when she drives back to Conway.

The sexual-assault program at Lonoke County Safe Haven is “in the works,” she said. “It’s a slow process; we want to get it going.”

It has been a long road for Francis to get to Arkansas.

She grew up in Colorado Springs, Colorado, the youngest of three children born to Tom and Spencie Netschert, who were strict but loving parents, she said.

“I had a very good upbringing, a loving family. I was raised in a very happy home,” she said. Francis said she and her siblings were in 4-H and had horses, cows, pigs and sheep.

When she talks about her parents, she cries.

“They have walked beside me; they have helped me. They have made me so strong, and I have made myself strong, too. I tear up every time I look at other parents and think, ‘Why? Why can’t you be like my parents?’”

Francis said she was not sexually abused, but she thinks about what could have been. She recalled that when she was about 10, an uncle she despised placed his hand on the inside her thigh when he was giving her and her sister a ride somewhere in his car. “He told me it was OK to do that,” she said. When she got home, Francis told her mother what happened, and Francis never saw her uncle again. “She believed me,” Francis said. The man has since died.

Francis also ended a relationship with a boyfriend who was taking drugs, unbeknownst to her, she said. One day, he backed her into a corner, cursed at her and threatened to hit her. She broke up with him, but she realized later that he had been emotionally abusive for months. The red flags of controlling who she saw and spoke to were there, but she didn’t see them at the time.

When she was starting her career, Francis wanted to be a police officer or an investigator. She has a degree in criminal justice from Remington College in Colorado. She worked for a halfway house for inmates in Colorado and repaired bathtubs on the side.

Her parents moved to Alaska with her two sons, and she and her fiance, Trent Francis, moved there in 2005. She worked security at a grocery store, and he was a supervisor. They were married on a beach in Soldotna, Alaska, in 2006.

She took a job at a domestic-violence shelter in Alaska because the executive director was the mother of a friend.

“I had no experience, nothing, and she (the executive director) gave me a chance, and I loved it,” Francis said.

She was the legal and sexual-assault advocate, as well as acting shelter manager. Her husband worked as an oil-rig supervisor in North Dakota.

“Trent was the love of my life; he was my soul mate,” Francis said. She said he was also an alcoholic.

Trent died by suicide in 2011. “He made his choice, and I had to deal with it,” she said. “I’ve finally forgiven him and learned to move on.”

She described him as a good-looking, likeable smart aleck, who loved hunting and being outdoors.

Francis left the shelter in Alaska and worked for a company that helped the disabled; then she got a job working at a child advocacy center.

“I dealt with children being sexually abused and physically abused. I love children. To help a child is … yeah,” she said, smiling.

She started dating a man and moved to Wyoming, where she worked with the World Young Women’s Christian Association and was the direct-service advocate for domestic-violence victims.

“I had to go pick up victims at their homes,” she said. “I didn’t like it.”

It was dangerous, she said, and that’s when she started driving the bright-blue truck.

“For my own safety, I made my vehicle noticeable,” she said, “and I just kept it that way.”

Francis recalled meeting a victim at a bar while the police went to the woman’s home and arrested her husband.

“I had to bring her to her house at 2 in the morning to get her belongings,” Francis said. The woman’s living conditions were shocking. “Never, never in my life would I live in that situation.”

However, the woman thrived away from her abuser. “She’s my success story,” Francis said. The woman received an order of protection against her abuser, moved to another state and continued her life.

Francis said she left that position and went to a counseling center as an advocate for men and women with alcohol and drug addiction. When the center closed, she got a job at a youth home in Wyoming.

“My youngest son met a Southern belle in Wyoming,” she said, and he moved to Conway to be with her. “I said, ‘I’m going to follow.’”

Francis took the position at Lonoke County Safe Haven on March 1, 2017.

“My day-to-day thing is we help them with housing, their daily needs, support groups, employment” and assistance programs, such as Medicaid, for which they might qualify. She also helps the women obtain orders of protection.

“Some women come with just the clothes on their backs; some come with everything, and we’re like, ‘Oh, no, you need to get a storage unit,’” she said, laughing.

Safe Haven Thrift Store opened in Cabot this year to help fund the programs, and Francis said the store has been successful.

“A lot of people call. A lot of people are donating, and a lot of people are helping out,” she said.

Sarah Brown, executive director of Lonoke County Safe Haven, said Francis has been invaluable to the shelter.

“Donna has been an amazing addition to our team,” Brown said. “Last year, as I was interviewing, Donna stood out to me with her prior experience with domestic violence and sexual-assault victims. She has a demeanor that encourages conversations with everyone. This is exceptionally valuable when we are dealing with victims of abuse, who may feel nervous or scared when sharing their stories.”

Brown said Francis’ organizational, communication and interpersonal skills are “irreplaceable.”

“Donna is also very engaged in all of our fundraising activities — she enjoys telling people what we do and how we do it. All of these, combined with her past experience, have helped LCSH tremendously,” Brown said.

Francis has one day off; then it’s back to work Tuesday morning in Conway, where she lives.

She started working for the Women’s Shelter of Central Arkansas in January; it’s a 32-hour-a-week position.

Carrie Curtis, executive director of the Women’s Shelter of Central Arkansas, said Francis had applied for another shelter position before being hired.

“She was a very impressive candidate and more qualified than what that position needed, so I kept her on file,” Curtis said.

“She has had the opportunity to work in Alaska and Wyoming with both domestic-violence and sexual-assault programs, so she has a long history of being an advocate and understands that rules change,” Curtis said. “Wherever you work, the legal system may be vastly different, but a client’s needs are centered around us being the best advocate we can be for them, no matter what it takes.”

Francis is getting training from the Arkansas Coalition Against Domestic Violence in Little Rock, as well the Arkansas Coalition Against Sexual Assault. She also trains sexual-assault program volunteers.

A young woman interested in volunteering came to her office last week. Francis gave her books to read and videos to watch, and asked her to watch The Hunting Ground on Netflix.

“It’s about college sexual assault. It’s very, very good,” Francis said.

The Women’s Shelter of Central Arkansas’ sexual-assault program isn’t as well-known as it should be, Francis said.

“I’m trying to build it back up again,” she said. “We need to let people know we are here, and we can offer services to empower them and help them become stronger individuals.”

Francis said she has sent out dozens of letters, including to the University of Central Arkansas in Conway, as well as Hendrix College, Conway Mayor Bart Castleberry and the Conway Police Department to let them know what’s available.

“We get an occasional phone call that a victim is at the hospital, and they need help,” she said. Francis said the program is designed for males and females, ages 18 and older.

“We meet strictly at the hospital,” whether Conway Regional Medical Center or Baptist Medical Center-Conway, she said.

She shows victims the crime-compensation form, which can help the person pay for any attorney, etc., if the case goes to court.

Francis said she wants to spread the word about the sexual-assault support-group meetings, which take place from 8-9 a.m. and 6-7 p.m. Wednesdays in her office at the Conway Ministry Center, 766 Harkrider St. Anyone is welcome, regardless of when their sexual assault happened, she said. The domestic-violence support group meets from 9-10 a.m. and 7-8 p.m. Wednesdays. The 24-hour number for Sexual Assault Crisis Response of Central Arkansas is (501) 358-6217.

She said one of the more frustrating parts of her job is that women often get blamed for sexual assault.

“It’s unbelievable how many people actually blame the woman,” Francis said. “People say, ‘She shouldn’t have worn that. She shouldn’t have done those tequila shots. She shouldn’t have been in that dark alley. She shouldn’t have been in the Kroger parking lot at 2 a.m.’ No, we have a right, too.

“I don’t judge. I’ve got my stories. I will never pretend to walk in other people’s shoes. Even though we may share the same story, we walk a different path. I don’t try to pretend, ‘Oh, I’ve been there; oh, I’ve done that.’”

But she’s here now, available to listen and help however she can.

You can’t miss her; she’s the one in the big blue truck.

Senior writer Tammy Keith can be reached at (501) 327-0370 or tkeith@arkansasonline.com.

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Conway Corp to flush city’s water mains

Conway, AR – Conway Corp is currently flushing the city’s water mains and will be working during April in the area of Centennial Valley east along Tyler Street to Harkrider Street. During the month, the area of Conway bordered on the south by Robins, the west by Farris Road to Prince Street, west to Country Club and north to Tyler will also be flushed.

Utility crews typically flush the water distribution system once a year to remove sediment and improve drinking water quality. When flushing, fire hydrants are opened, increasing the velocity of water moving through the pipes. Flushing removes sediments that may affect the water’s taste and color and is an essential preventive maintenance strategy for the water distribution system.

According to Water Systems Manager Lee Tedford, while a loss of water pressure is common, the process doesn’t typically interrupt water service. After flushing, tap water may appear “brownish.”

“Let your tap run for several minutes until the water released is clear,” Tedford said. “The colored water is unsightly, but still safe for consumption.”

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George Conway deletes tweets critical of Trump

Kellyanne Conway’s husband has begun deleting a series of tweets he posted in the last month that are critical of President Donald Trump.

George Conway, a conservative lawyer Trump once considered nominating as solicitor general, deleted several tweets that called attention to Trump’s legal woes, his difficulty in finding his next communications director and the White House’s later debunked denials of staff shakeups.

Most notably, Conway deleted a tweet that called Trump’s denials of reports that later turned out to be true "absurd" and sarcastically noted that "people are banging on the doors to be his communications director."

6% Interest Savings Accounts

His wife, counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway, is among those who may take over as White House communications director — at least on an interim basis — following Hope Hicks’ departure.

"I have nothing to add," George Conway said when reached by phone Thursday.

Pressed as to why he deleted the tweets, he simply said, "no reason."

Conway also nixed a retweet of a clip of CBS’ "60 Minutes" piece on Stormy Daniels in which a former Federal Election Commission chairman Trevor Potter says the $130,000 payment to silence Daniels may have been an illegal campaign contribution.

He also undid a retweet in which a former associate counsel in President Barack Obama’s White House blasted Trump’s move to make White House officials sign nondisclosure agreements.

"Occasionally an official would ask us in the Obama White House Counsel’s Office if they could make their staff sign NDAs. We’d tell them no," Bassin’s tweet reads. "WH staff work for the public."

Conway also deleted a tweet in which he compared Trump’s later disproven denials of staff shakeup reports to former President Bill Clinton’s grand jury testimony amid his impeachment scandal.

"depends on what the meaning of the word ‘are’ is," Conway tweeted. The tweet was gone from his Twitter page on Thursday.

As of this report, Conway has not deleted the most recent tweet that drew attention to his Twitter feed, in which Conway referred to a report that Trump’s lawyer John Dowd discussed pardons with attorneys to Trump’s former aides.

"This is flabbergasting," Conway tweeted on Wednesday.

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